Chandler Edition – June 2021

CHANDLER EDITION VOLUME 2, ISSUE 11 JUNE 22JULY 19, 2021 ONLINE AT City seeks approval

CHANDLER EDITION

VOLUME 2, ISSUE 11 JUNE 22JULY 19, 2021

ONLINE AT

City seeks approval for $273million bond

Chandler City Council will ask voters to approve a $272.69 million bond package that would fund infrastructure improvements across the city. Here are some project highlights within each category. BOND FUNDING PRIORITIES

Fire $25.16 Million

Facilities $33.57 Million Infrastructure maintenance and improvements $33.57 million

Police $55.19 Million

BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

Chandler residents will see a $272.69 million bond request on the Nov. 2 ballot after Chandler City Council voted May 27 to call for an election. The bond money would fund a series of multimil- lion-dollar projects relating to streets, parks, public safety and city facilities. It has been 13 years since the city’s last bond election when voters approved $451.44 million in bond funds. Voters will see ve questions on the November ballot. If approved, the bondwould not increase the city’s portion of a resident’s property tax bill, according to city ocials. “It’s easy to spend money; there is always a need and always recommendations,” Chandler Mayor Kevin Hartke said. “But we were able to look at the need and the responses and get that down to a CONTINUED ON 10

Rebuild Station No. 282 $6.96 million Rebuild Station No. 284 $8.72 million

Forensic services facility $38.32 million Main station renovations $9.69 million

IMPACTS

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Parks $72.99 Million

HEALTHCARE EDITION 2021

Phase 2 Mesquite Groves Park $19.56 million Regional park development $18.07 million

Streets $85.78 Million

$272.69 million

Ocotillo Road shared-use path $16.34 million Cooper Road extension $8.32 million

COVID19 DATA

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XXXXXXX HOSPITAL DIRECTORY SUSAN BAILEY Q&A

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SOURCE: CITY OF CHANDLERCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

2021 H E A L T H C A R E E D I T I O N

Pandemic highlights, contributes tomental health challenges BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

COVID19’SMENTAL HEALTH TOLL Health ocials, crisis response teams and mental health professionals have reported more people reporting anxiety, stress, depression and grief in the last year. Nationally, data suggests more people are reporting negative eects to mental health due to COVID-19 than prior to the pandemic.

East Valley mental health profes- sionals and crisis response teams have seen more people reach out for help with anxiety, depression, grief and stress in the last year than in years past—but some say the COVID-19 pan- demic has only exacerbated existing mental health challenges. “It’s about trying to help people know that it’s OK to feel lost; it’s OK to feel as though you are grieving this lost time,” said Jessica Westmiller, crisis intervention coordinator for the city of Chandler Fire Department. “Grief is a natural emotion, and we move through grief—we don’t just get over CONTINUED ON 16

THE SCREAMERY

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Jan. 2021

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HIGHLIGHTS FROMTHISMONTH

FROMAMY: Although much of this month’s content is focused on health care news, one of our front-page stories provides information on an issue that Chandler residents will vote on in November. City Council recently decided to put forward a $272.69 million bond package, which will help pay for items related to parks, re, police and roadways. Learn more about the impact this package could have on residents. Amy Lawson, PUBLISHER

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FROMALEXA: Our second front-page story this month delves into the mental health impacts of the coronavirus pandemic, and experts shared their thoughts on dealing with crisis response for the last year. We collected local resources that we hope you might nd useful if you are struggling with mental health. Alexa D’Angelo, EDITOR

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CHANDLER EDITION • JUNE 2021

IMPACTS

Businesses that have recently opened or are coming soon, relocating or expanding

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Crazy Tuna

Uncle Lee’s Kitchen

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COURTESY CRAZY TUNA

ALEXA D’ANGELO/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

4 Mountain America Credit Union opened in May at 3471 W. Frye Road, Chandler. The bank offers services including checking and savings. The Chandler location is the first in the city of Chandler, though another location is open in Gilbert. 480-697-5754. www.macu.com 5 Crazy Tuna opened in May in Chan- dler at 941 W. Elliot Road, Chandler. The restaurant offers all-you-can-eat sushi, sashimi and other options including dinner entrees. 480-855-5535 6 Riggs Ranch Family Dental opened in Chandler in May. The dental practice is located at 975 E. Riggs Road, Ste. 8. The practice offers general services, like dental cleanings and fillings, restorative services and cosmetic services. 480-608-9504. www.riggsranchdental.com 7 Perfect Smiles Dentistry opened in late May at 2040 S. Alma School Road, Ste. 21, Chandler. The dentistry practice offers cosmetic dentistry, restorative dentistry and preventive dentistry. 480-841-6925. www.perfectsmilesdentistry.com COMING SOON 8 Uncle Lee’s Kitchen , a Chinese and Thai food restaurant, will open in Chan- dler this year. The restaurant will be the first Arizona location. The restaurant will be located in the same shopping center as 99 Ranch Market at the corner of Chan-

location near 99 Ranch Market in Chan- dler. The restaurant will be in the same shopping center as the Asian grocery store located at the corner of Chandler Boulevard and Ray Road. An opening date is not yet known. https://eatramenhood.com 10 At My Place Cafe, a 5-year-old Fili- pino restaurant on the southwest corner of Dobson and Guadalupe in southwest Mesa, is moving to Chandler. It closed its Mesa location May 28 and plans to reopen in September in its new home across the street from Chandler Fashion Center. 480-838-1008 11 Manuel’s Mexican Restaurant and Cantina will open at 4210 S. Arizona Ave., Chandler, this summer, according to the company website. The Mexican restaurant will mark the chain’s eighth location across the Valley, but it will be the first location in Chandler. www.manuelsaz.fiestaconcepts.com ANNIVERSARIES 12 Floridino’s Pizza & Pasta celebrat- ed its 25th anniversary June 1. The Chandler business is located at 590 N. Alma School Road, Ste. 35, Chandler. The business offers a variety of Italian dishes, including pastas, pizzas, calzones and the restaurant’s signature pizza muffins. 480-812-8433. www.floridinos.net 13 Jeremiah’s Italian Ice celebrated its first anniversary in Chandler on June 2. The business, located at 4050 S. Alma School Road, Ste. A3, Chandler, serves soft ice cream, Italian ice and The Gelati, which is a combination of ice cream and Italian ice. 480-702-0211. www.jeremiahsice.com

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NOWOPEN 1 99 Ranch Market opened May 29 after a ribbon-cutting ceremony. The store is located at 1920 W. Chandler Blvd., Chandler. 99 Ranch Market is the largest Asian supermarket chain in the United States. The grocery store anchors a development at the corner of Chandler Boulevard and Ray Road that will feature several new Asian businesses that are all scheduled to open in the coming year. www.99ranch.com

2 810 Billiards & Bowling opened June 14 in Chandler. The pool hall and bowling alley business is located at 3455 W. Frye Road, Chandler. The business also has a food and drink menu with happy hour 3 Brooklyn V’s Pizza opened its latest Chandler location at 4991 S. Alma School Road, Chandler, on May 24. The restau- rant serves a variety of appetizers and pizzas. 480-572-1247. www.brooklynvspizza.com specials. 480-576-2449. www.810bowling.com

dler Boulevard and Ray Road. www.uncleleeskitchen.com.

9 Ramen Hood , a build-your-own ramen bowl restaurant, will open a

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

TO-DO LIST

Chandler events

COMPILED BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

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Floridino’s Pizza & Pasta

ALEXA D’ANGELO/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

CLOSINGS 14 Garcia’s Mexican Restaurant closed its 15-year-old location on the southwest corner of Arizona and Ocotillo avenues in Chandler in May. Several other locations of the restaurant remain open across the Valley in Mesa, Tempe, Phoenix and Glendale. Manuel’s Mexican Restaurant and Cantina has already announced it will take over the location. www.garciasmexicanrestaurants.net 15 Grubstak closed June 13. The locally owned restaurant was located at 4165 S. Gilbert Road, Ste. 5, Chandler. Owner Colton Grubb posted on the company’s social media that the closure was “less than ideal.” The Chandler location first opened in 2018 after the company began the business in Gilbert in 2016. https://grubstak.com

Fourth of July festivities this year in Chandler will be a drive-in event. (Courtesy city of Chandler)

CHANDLER TOHOST JULY 4 FIREWORKSWITHDRIVE-IN

basis. Event attendees are allowed to sit in their truck beds, and immediately adjacent in front of, to the side, or behind their vehicle in folding chairs or in the nearby grass area. Local food trucks and street vendors will be on-site, according to the city. Tumbleweed Park is located at 2250 S. McQueen Road, on the southwest corner of McQueen and Germann roads.

Chandler is celebrating Independence Day with a drive-in July 4 fireworks event at Tumbleweed Park. The fireworks show will begin promptly at 9 p.m. and be approximately 20 minutes long, according to the city. The event requires a $5 parking pass. Chandler residents are given priority access to purchase passes through June 17, before general sales open to the public June 18. The parking area will open at 7 p.m. with a limited number of spots, according to the city. Parking will be assigned on a first-come, first-served

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CHANDLER EDITION • JUNE 2021

W. BASELINE RD.

TRANSPORTATIONUPDATES

W. GUADALUPE RD.

COMPILED BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

W. ELLIOT RD.

Status: Traffic restrictions are one lane in each direction. The project is approxi- mately 85% complete. Timeline: March 2020-August 2021 Cost: $25.96 million Funding sources: town of Gilbert, Maricopa Association of Governments 4 Lindsay/Loop 202 interchange An interchange at Lindsay Road and Loop 202 will be built to provide access to Loop 202 and a frontage road system on the north side of Loop 202 between Lindsay Road and Gilbert Road. Status: Traffic restrictions on Lindsay began in March and will remain through- out the remainder of the project. The project is coordinating traffic control with the Germann Road improvements project. Construction is 31% complete. Timeline: October 2020-November 2021 Cost: $18.15 million Funding sources: town of Gilbert bonds and funds, Maricopa Association of Gov- ernments, developer contributions

Road to four lanes—two lanes in each direction. The project begins about 3,500 feet north of Chandler Heights Road to Riggs Road. Improvements include the construction of raised medians, bike lanes, left-turn lanes, sidewalks, curb, gutter, street lighting, traffic signals, drainage components, landscaping and utility re- locations. The project was outlined in the city’s 10-year capital improvement plan as a necessary infrastructure improvement. Status: Electric crews continue work on the east side of Cooper to install electric conduit and future streetlights as part of the conversion of overhead power lines to underground. Work has also begun on the segment from Via de Palmas moving north toward Chandler Heights. Timeline: February 2020- September 2022 Cost: $17.17 million Funding source: city of Chandler 3 Val Vista Drive widening The town of Gilbert is widening Val Vista Drive from Appleby Road—about where Val Vista narrows to one lane in each direction—to Riggs Road. The result will be a six-lane section from Ocotillo Road to Merlot Street with a raised, landscaped median; bike lanes; sidewalks; and street- lights. It would then reduce to four lanes to the south. Traffic signals will be in- stalled at Appleby, Ocotillo and Chandler Heights roads.

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ONGOINGPROJECTS 1 Repaving McQueen Road

intersection. The project will include traffic control, tarping and slurry sealing in addition to restriping the roadway. Timeline: five days once started Cost: $135,000-$162,000 Funding source: city of Chandler 2 Cooper Road improvement An effort is underway to expand Cooper

The city of Chandler is repaving a segment of McQueen Road from Germann to Queen Creek roads. Status: City officials said the project was expected to start sometime in May once an ongoing improvement project is com- pleted at the Queen Creek and McQueen

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CITY&EDUCATION

News from Chandler & Chandler USD

COMPILED BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

NUMBERTOKNOW

Chandler begins hiring incentives for newand open police positions

Council OK’s 2021-22 operating budget CHANDLER City Council approved the city’s $1.06 billion budget June 10 and approved the city’s 10-year capital improvement plan for $1.27 billion. “The new budget will be focused on rebuilding, returning to normalcy, and providing residents and busi- nesses with the resources they need to thrive,” Mayor Kevin Hartke said in his weekly video address on social media June 14. The budget adds positions to the city’s police department and sets aside funding for major projects including a planned regional park in southeast Chandler and work on some of the city’s main arterial streets. The budget slightly reduces the city’s property tax rate, making it $1.1126 per $100 of assessed value, down from $1.1201, according to the budget. This year’s budget represents a 13.6% increase from the previous year’s budget—a budget that included reductions to minimize any potential financial impacts from the COVID-19 pandemic. BUDGET BREAKDOWN Total: $1,058,074,338 • $411,883,447 —departmental operating budgets • $73,753,925 —debt service • $5,086,418 —equipment, technology and vehicle replacements • $198,378,473 —contingencies and reserves in various funds SOURCE: CITY OF CHANDLER/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

$14.97M

Chandler USD

MEETINGHIGHLIGHTS CHANDLER City Council authorized a grant agreement May 27 with the Arizona Department of Transportation for the installation of a wildlife exclusion fence at Chandler Municipal Airport in an amount not to exceed $996,750. CHANDLER City Council on May 27 authorized a grant agreement with the Federal Aviation Administration for reconstruction of drainage headwalls on a runway at Chandler Municipal Airport in an amount not to exceed $300,000. Also approved was a construction contract with Combs Construction Co. Inc. in an amount not to exceed $230,541 for the removal and replacement. CHANDLERUSD The governing board approved May 12 an expenditure of $344,411.44 for books and computers for the district’s new high school. Chandler City Council June 24, July 12, 6 p.m. 88 E. Chicago St., Chandler 480-782-2181 • www.chandleraz.gov Chandler USD board July 14, 7 p.m. 1525 W. Frye Road, Chandler 480-812-7000 • www.cusd80.com MEETINGSWE COVER Chief Financial Officer Lana Berry presented to the governing board May 12 the district’s third budget revision. In the revision, Berry highlighted that the district was facing a loss of $14.97 million in revenue from a decrease in student enrollment for the 2020-21 school year. The governing board voted to approve the latest budget revision. That represents a loss of just under 2,000 students who were largely in grades K-8, according to data from the district.

CHANDLER The city of Chandler announced May 24 a hiring incentive to bolster its recruitment of police officers, detention officers and dispatchers for the Chandler Police Department. The hiring incentive will be $5,000 for lateral sworn police officers, $3,500 for police officer recruits, and $2,000 for detention officers and dispatchers, according to a news release from the city. The incentive is a way to attract candidates to fill vacancies due to retirements and adding new positions. It supplements current recruiting efforts for sworn and civilian positions in the police department, according to the city. The city’s proposed budget for next fiscal year would add 12 new police

positions plus 15 overfill positions that allow individuals to be hired and trained while current officers continue serving the community. Chandler City Council will consider adoption of the proposed budget during its regularly sched- uled meetings May 27 and June 10. HIRING INCENTIVES The following amounts are being offered by the city.

$3,500 Police officer recruits

$5,000 Sworn police officers

$2,000 Detention officers and dispatchers

SOURCE: CITY OF CHANDLER/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

District unveils COVID-19plan

in place for this year and required masks for students and staff. The plan also outlines that the Maricopa County Department of Public Health has the authority to determine if a school closure is necessary due to a rise in COVID-19 cases. Field trips may be allowed with school site approval, according to the plan presented. The new mitigation strategies came in a week that the Pfizer vaccine was approved for kids ages 12-15 and Arizona began administering the vaccine to those age groups. The entire plan can be found on the district’s website. The Chandler USD new school year begins July 21.

CHANDLER USD Mask usage, social distancing requirements and rules around large gatherings will change throughout Chandler USD for the upcoming school year. The CUSD administration pre- sented its COVID-19 mitigation plan to the governing board during a study session May 12 that called for optional masks for the 2021-22 school year and 3 feet of social distancing where feasible—a change from the 6-foot social distancing guidance

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CHANDLER EDITION • JUNE 2021

HOW ITWORKS

The Screamery oers classic avors and some unique ones—such as Blueberry Cheesecake. (Alexa D’Angelo/Community Impact Newspaper)

Kenny and Linda Sarnoski at Chandler’s The Screamery which opened in 2019. (Courtesy Linda Sarnoski)

BUSINESS FEATURE

The Screamery keeps recipes simple by using whole and natural ingredients and a ve-step process.

The Screamery Owners craft old fashioned ice cream with modern day avors K enny and Linda Sarnoski were on a mission to consume better foods and pay more attention to the ingredients they were Linda and Kenny knew that when they created their business, they wanted it to be their recipes and their ingredients from start to nish. Through their research, they learned they would need to get a pasteurization certication and when they did, they became the rst Arizona business to do so. “Our ice cream has this amazing taste, and BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

Step 1 – Premium whole milk, cream, sugar, eggs and natural avors are combined. The mix is pasteurized and chilled.

Step 2 – The ice cream base is aged in the refrigerator so that natural avors settle.

Step 3 – The ice cream is churned in the batch freezer adding air to the mix, the secret to making the ice cream so creamy. Step 4 – The ice cream is then placed in the Hardening Cabinet to ensure the creamiest texture possible. Step 5 – The all-natural avor-infused ice cream is placed in the Dipping Cabinet to be enjoyed.

consuming about a decade ago, but Linda said she had a hard time letting go of her favorite treat—ice cream. So Kenny sought out to make homemade ice cream that was free of the ingredients and chemi- cals that comes from ice cream one might get at the grocery store. “You wouldn’t believe all the chemicals in store- bought ice cream,” Linda said. “I thought, ‘Why do we have to have all that? Why can’t we just have good, old-fashioned ice cream?’” So Kenny began making it at home, Linda said, and it quickly turned into a tradition enjoyed by friends and family. “We are both entrepreneurs at heart,” Linda said. “Even though we had little kids and typical jobs, we always knew we would end up doing something that was our own.” Kenny began doing research and found that few ice cream shops were making their own ice cream from scratch—a majority of them were using a base that was created by the Food and Drug Administra- tion and then churning their ice cream from there.

people weren’t used to it,” Linda said. “Your brain knows when it’s getting something good. The ingredients in our ice cream are good, and you can tell the dierence in the taste.” The couple opened the rst Screamery location in Tucson seven years ago. In September 2019, the couple opened the Chandler location in the heart of the city’s downtown. “We were getting ready to go into the slow winter season when we opened, and we were revving up for a great spring and summer, and then the pandemic happened,” Linda said. “We had such high hopes that the Chandler store was going to be hitting it out of the ballpark, but right when we were starting to, everything was changing. But the good news is, on the very bright side the last few months we have seen that store just explode with people coming and knowing about us and loving us and our ice creams.”

The Screamery 140 N. Arizona Ave., Ste.

E. CHANDLER BLVD.

106, Chandler 480-597-3322

www.thescreamery.com Hours: Sun.-Thu. noon- 10 p.m., Fri.-Sat. noon- 11 p.m.

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CHANDLER EDITION • JUNE 2021

DINING FEATURE

THREE DISHES TO TRY

AHI POKE $16.95

BEEF TIP FETTUCCINE $19

TURKEY BACONAVOCADOWRAP $13

Grain bowls are a staple on the Cherish menu, according to the owners. (Photos by Alexa D’Angelo/Community Impact Newspaper)

This dish contains roasted eggplant, oven-dried tomato and Greek sauce with cucumber, feta and pickled red onion.

The owners say sandwiches and wraps are a lunch menu favorite. The turkey bacon wrap is co-owner Stephanie Nelson’s favorite.

Cherish FarmFresh Eatery Restaurant crafts menu with health, dietary restrictions in mind D avid and Stephanie Nelson knew they wanted to create a restaurant that would leave people feeling full, but not in a ready- BY ALEXA D’ANGELO

“EVERYTHINGON THE MENU IS GOOD. EVEN IF YOU’RE NOT VEGAN, IT TASTES GOODAND IS GOOD FORYOU.” STEPHANIE NELSON, COOWNER

much every day at the restaurant, David said. “We like talking to people and hearing about their experience with us, and they usually all have something positive to say,” he said. “This is how we like to spend our time; we like to come through and watch people enjoy the food and the hospitality.” The menu is composed of a range of dishes from salads to tacos to braised short ribs and a variety of sandwiches. David said the menu was created with dietary restrictions in mind, and many of the dishes are keto-friendly, vegan or gluten-free. Nearly all the items on the menu can be prepared to t a customer’s dietary needs. “We wanted a healthy concept that provided a place where people could eat if they were vegan but have a partner who is not vegan,” David said. “It’s hard to nd places that cater to that. We really wanted to give people a place where anyone could eat a good, healthy meal.” Stephanie that she eats at the restaurant every day, and the chef there is always looking to come up with new recipes. The menu will likely expand in the coming year. “Everything on the menu is good,” Stephanie said. “Even if you’re not vegan, it tastes good and is good for you.”

to-burst kind of way. They wanted to make a place where health and wellness were at the core of each menu item, and it was important to them that they were able to produce food that could be modied for dietary restrictions. “I was a corporate litigation lawyer in L.A., and I decided I wanted to have a positive impact on the community,” David said. “I decided to open a restaurant and thought that would be a good way to positively impact people’s lives.” The restaurant opened in Chandler February 2019. The name, Cherish Farm Fresh Eatery, was born out of David’s desire for people to have a good time in his restaurant. “I wanted people to cherish their time and experience when they were here,” the co-owner said. “I wanted them to be able to be healthier and feel better when they nished their meal. I wanted it to be the kind of good food that leaves you full but doesn’t leave you with that feeling of regret after a big meal.” David and Stephanie can both be found pretty

Cherish FarmFresh Eatery 2551 W. Queen Creek Road, Chandler 480-350-7245 http://cherishrestaurant.com Hours: Mon.-Thu. 10:30 a.m.-8 p.m., Fri. 10:30 a.m.- 9 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.-9 p.m., Sun 9 a.m.-8 p.m.

E. QUEEN CREEK RD.

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9

CHANDLER EDITION • JUNE 2021

History of Chandler bonds The city previously held bond elections in 2000, 2004 and 2007, and city officials say Chandler has historically made the most of bond authorization dollars. 2000 Major projects completed: Paseo Trail System, Police Property and Evidence System, Tumbleweed Park development $121.34 million

CONTINUED FROM 1

number we believe will accommodate the necessary projects and not raise the secondary property tax rate.” The proposed bond calls for $72.99 million for parks, $55.19 million for the Chandler Police Department, $25.16 million for the Chandler Fire Department, $33.57 million for city facilities and $85.78 million on the city’s streets. All the funding is one- time funding—meaning it is intended to go toward big-ticket items, not toward ongoing costs such as salaries. The project list and total amount for the bond were proposed to Chandler City Council this spring after a year- long effortwith49peoplewhoworked on the citizens bond exploratory com- mittee. The residents and local lead- ers worked for a year to decide what projects should be funded with the bond dollars, whittling it down from 80 projects estimated to cost $851.97 million to $272.69 million. “We whittled it down to 42 projects in five categories,” said former Mayor Boyd Dunn, the citizens bond explor- atory committee chair. “We looked at the list and decided which projects should be prioritized for funding with this bond, and it was a unanimous decision of 49 individuals. And this proposal still meets the needs of the community without raising taxes.” No tax rate increase Chandler Chief Financial Officer Dawn Lang said because of the popu- lation growth the city has seen in the last decade, the bond will not cause an increase on residents’ property tax bills. “The property tax rate goes hand in hand with the growth of the city,” Lang said. “If your assessed values are going up based on annual appre- ciation, it adds capacity, and the levy will go up.”

2007 remaining bond authorization

$153.72 million 2004 Major projects completed: Chandler/Desert Breeze Fire Station, Snedigar Sportsplex, Boys & Girls Club

$272.69 million 2021 Major projects proposed: Mesquite Groves Park—Phase 2, Rebuild Fire Station No. 282, forensic services facility 2007 Major projects completed: public safety training facility, Ocotillo Water Reclaimation Facility, Paseo Vista Recreation Area $25.30 million $451.43 million total ($426.13 million ultilized)

Property tax comparison per $100 Fiscal year 2020-21

$3

$1.1201

$2.3959

$2

$2.1296

$1.8012

$1.4400

$1

$1.1171

$1.0415

$0.9896

$0

Mesa

Peoria

Phoenix

Gilbert

Scottsdale

Chandler

Glendale

Tempe

No changes to property taxes According to Chief Financial Officer Dawn Lang, the city is not expecting the bond to create a need to raise residents’ property taxes. She said the city accounts for the smallest portion of a resident’s property tax bill. $0.675 Public schools and community college districts $0.227 Maricopa County and special districts $0.098 City of Chandler SOURCE: CITY OF CHANDLER/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

General obligation bonds, such as the one proposed for the November ballot, are funds borrowed by the city for specific public purposes, Lang said. Bonds enable a city to complete larger projects that would otherwise be unaffordable or unachievable with typical revenue streams. Authorization to borrow must be approved by voters and is repaid with property tax revenue. The city still has $25.3 million in

remaining authorization from its 2007 bond, Lang said. “We knew that we did not have enough bond authorization to get us through our 10-year plan and would need more,” Lang said. That need led the city to begin iden- tifying possible bond projects and come up with a number to take to City Council. “It’s important that we make sure we are able to do projects responsibly

and in such a way that it isn’t going to raise the community’s taxes,” Hartke said. “We have needs because we have grown. A lot of our roads were constructed in the ‘80s, and even many of the buildings that serve the community were built more than 20 years ago, and they just need updat- ing and repairs. It’s really important to us; we wouldn’t bring it to the com- munity if it weren’t.” Rick Heumann, resident and former

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

Bond election timeline After City Council approved the

Chandler City Council member, said he believes the bond is necessary to maintain the city’s infrastructure. “Like your car or house, if you do normal maintenance all the time it’s a lot easier to do instead of waiting until everything breaks and having to deal with the costs of replacement instead of repair,” Heumann said. Proposed projects Voters will see multiple questions on the ballot asking for funding for police, fire, municipal facilities and public works, according to city officials. Under public works, one of the projects outlined is lengthening Coo- per Road from Queen Creek Road to Insight Way near the Chandler Munic- ipal Airport. That project is expected to cost $8.32 million, according to city documents. “We are always focusing on the roads and the expansion of roads,” Dunn said. “But we looked at active transit, too, and the dedicated bike paths that are separate from the streets in key corridors so people have another means of transportation. These are the final stages of what we call ‘build-out,’ and we are approach- ing our eventual build-out so we were

looking at the other things we can do to help people get around.” For police, bond funding would go toward several facilities improve- ments, according to city documents and to the creation of a $38.33 million forensic services facility. The facility would be a central location for all the forensic-related services operated by the Chandler Police Department. The most significant proposed proj- ects for the Chandler Fire Department would be the rebuilding of two of the city’s fire stations: Stations Nos. 282 and 284, projected to cost $6.96 mil- lion in bond dollars and $8.7 million, respectively. Chandler Fire Chief Tom Dwiggins said the rebuilding of both stations is necessary as the buildings no longer meet the needs of the department. “Fire Station [No.] 284 is the [busi- est] station in the city,” Dwiggins said. “Construction on that firehouse will be going on while crews are still work- ing out of it. It’s just reached a point where the building is getting older and needs to be updated to withstand the next several decades.” Bond dollars would also go toward new fire emergency vehicles— expected to cost $4.56 million—as well as allow the department to

purchase thermal imaging camera replacements for the city’s firefight- ers, Dwiggins said. “The cameras allow us to see inside the walls when we are in a fire to see where it might be growing or spread- ing and provides extra safety for the firefighters,” Dwiggins said. Mickey Ohland, Chandler park development and operations man- ager, said if voters approve the bond, the city would be able to construct a regional park in southeast Chandler— an area identified as underserved by the city’s existing parks. The project is expected to cost around $18million. “That southeast regional park would be huge for that area that really needs more parks options,” Ohland said. “We hope to provide play fields and other amenities at this park.” Ohland said the bond dollars would also go toward the second phase of two parks—Lantana Ranch and Mes- quite Groves. Election Day is Nov. 2, but this will be an all-mail election, and ballots will be sent out in early October.

questions to be placed on the ballot, the process of educating the community continues until the November election.

Ballot language submitted to Maricopa County

18 JUNE

4 AUG.

Arguments pro/con filed with city clerk

Sample ballot/ informational pamphlet mailed to voters

20 SEPT.

4 OCT. 6 OCT.

Last day for voters to register for election

First day to mail out ballot

2 NOV.

Election Day

For more information, visit communityimpact.com .

SOURCE: CITY OF CHANDLER/COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

12

CHANDLER EDITION • JUNE 2021

COMPILED BY ALEXA D’ANGELO 2021 H E A L T H C A R E E D I T I O N HEALTH CARE SNAPSHOT

COMBATING COVID19

VACCINATION DEMOGRAPHICS

101

4.9%

Asian or Pacic Islander

All data is from the Maricopa County Department of Public Health and is current as of June 15.

85226

3.6% 15.6% 48.2% 16.0% 2.2%

85224

Black

85225

White Hispanic

COUNTYVACCINATIONS

202

85286

Other

43.8% have received at least one vaccination dose

10

85248

85249

Native American

Percent of Maricopa County residents with at least one COVID-19 vaccine dose

N

AGE BREAKDOWN

56.2% not yet received a vaccination dose

467,642 38.4% 276,222 48.6% 298,568 54.6% 341,818 67.7% 567,768 85.7%

15-34 35-44 55-64 45-54

VACCINATIONS BY ZIP CODE

23,121 31,838 22,852 26,067 26,447 25,824

85224 85225 85226 85248 85249 85286

65+

SOURCES: MARICOPA COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC HEALTH, ARIZONA DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH SERVICESCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

PEOPLE

2 0 2 1 H E A L T H C A R E E D I T I O N

Susan Bailey President of the American Medical Association

I AMCONVINCEDWE WILL BEAT COVID19.

WEWILLWIN THIS FIGHT. BUT … WE’RE ALL GOING TO HAVE TOPULL OURWEIGHT.

BY MATT STEPHENS

A board-certied immunologist and allergist, Susan Bailey was elected president of the American Medical Association, the country’s largest physician membership organization, in June 2020. Bailey spoke with Community Impact Newspaper on April 21. This interview has been edited for length and clarity. HOWWOULDYOUSAYTHE was totally unrealistic and aspira- tional. And it turns out we haven’t

SUSAN BAILEY, AMERICAN MEDICAL ASSOCIATION PRESIDENT

vaccinated will still be protected because there’s not enough disease in the community anymore to spread. … If we can get ahead of the variants by getting folks vaccinated, we’re going to be in great shape. But there’s no question we’re in a foot race. HOWLONGWILL THEVACCINES BE EFFECTIVE?WILLPEOPLE NEEDSHOTS EVERYYEAR? We would all like to know the answer to that. …We know that the mRNA [vaccines] give us at least six months, hopefully much longer than that. But it’s just going to take time to keep following patients, you know, very closely to see how… long their immunity lasts.

them into more physicians’ oces, because physicians have always been vaccines’ greatest ambassadors. … We also, in more cases, are going to need to bring the vaccines to people rather than asking people to come to the vaccines. Patients in marginalized communities without the transpor- tation, without good internet access, maybe even without a primary care physician or health clinic to go to—we are going to need to get vaccines into those communities. WHAT ISHERD IMMUNITY, AND HOWDOWEREACH IT? The concept of herd immunity is that if you get enough individuals vaccinated, that the few that aren’t

NATION, STATESANDHEALTH CARE COMMUNITYHAVEDONE INVACCINE CREATIONAND DISTRIBUTION? The public-private partnership in vaccine development was unprece- dented, and I think has been phenom- enally successful. … We feel very condent that no corners were cut during the manufac- turing process. A lot of red tape was cut. … Thank goodness the mRNA vaccines turned out to be phenome- nally safe and eective. … When President Biden was inau- gurated in January and set the goal of administering 100 million vaccines the rst 100 days, many of us thought that

reached the 100-day mark yet, and we have reached 200 million vaccine[s] administered. And so I think it’s been a tremendous achievement. WHATDOYOUSEEAS THE BIGGESTCHALLENGES TO VACCINEDISTRIBUTION MOVINGFORWARD? … Help[ing] increase vaccine con- dence in those individuals that haven’t been sure they … wanted to get it. … So we’re going to see a transition from mass-vaccination events … to smaller, more local events. And one thing AMA has been advocating for since the vaccines were authorized is to get

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CHANDLER EDITION • JUNE 2021

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COMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER • COMMUNITYIMPACT.COM

HEALTH CARE FACILITIES

2 0 2 1 H E A L T H C A R E E D I T I O N

Hospitals 1 Banner Ocotillo Medical Center 1405 S. Alma School Road, Chandler 4802567000 www.bannerhealth.com Banner Ocotillo Medical Center, opened Nov. 2. The hospital has 124 patient beds. Banner Ocotillo Medical Center oers emergency care; intensive care; endoscopy; cardiac ser- vices; imaging; surgical services; and women and infant services. 2 Chandler Regional Medical Center 1955 W. Frye Road, Chandler 4807283000 www.dignityhealth.org The hospital opened in 1961 and now has 338 acute care beds, 2,639 employees and 1,043 physicians. The hospital has a Level I trauma center and 24-hour emergency room. A new ve-story medical tower is under construction. 3 Dignity Health Arizona Specialty Hospital 2905 W. Warner Road, Ste. 1, Chandler 4806039000 www.dignityhealth.org The hospital is a surgical center specializing in bariatric, orthopedic, podiatry and other general services. Free-standing ERs 4 Dignity Health Arizona General ER 2977 E. Germann Road, Chandler 4807327540 www.dignityhealth.org

5 Phoenix ER & Medical Hospital Emergency Room 3050 S. Dobson Road, Chandler 4802845867 www.phoenixerhospital.com Urgent Cares 6 Banner Urgent Care 2950 S. Alma School Road, Ste. 1, Chandler 4808275690 https://urgentcare.bannerhealth.com 7 Chandler Valley Urgent Care Clinic 936 W. Chandler Blvd., Ste. 1, Chandler 4807921025 www.chandlerurgentcare.com 8 FastMed Urgent Care 2875 W. Ray Road, Ste. 8, Chandler 4808993070 www.fastmed.com 9 FastMed Urgent Care 3075 S. Arizona Ave., Ste. 1, Chandler 4802147828 www.fastmed.com 10 NextCare Urgent Care 600 S. Dobson Road, Ste. C26, Chandler 4808141560 www.nextcare.com 11 NextCare Urgent Care, Ocotillo 1155 W. Ocotillo Road, Ste. 4, Chandler 4803747400 www.nextcare.com

ALUPE RD.

CHANDLER

3

101

87

8

7

W. FRYE RD.

10

2

W. PECOS RD.

02

202

1

W. GERMANN RD.

4

6

5

9

11

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

FEATURED FACILITY

MAP NOT TO SCALE N

Heart arrhythmia center opens at Chandler Regional Medical Center

WHAT IS AN ARRHYTHMIA?

Tachycardia: This refers to a fast heartbeat—a resting heart rate greater than 100 beats a minute. Bradycardia: This refers to a slow heartbeat—a resting heart rate less than 60 beats a minute.

Dignity Health announced in March that Chan- dler Regional Medical Center would be home to a new heart arrhythmia center designed to diagnose and treat patients experiencing irregular heart- beats, such as atrial brillation, which is the most common arrhythmia. The center houses heart arrhythmia resources that are largely scarce across the Valley, according to a news release. The arrhythmia center is home to a team of physicians who use the most advanced technology in the center’s electrophysiology lab to determine what causes patients to experience abnormal heartbeats and develop an individualized plan of care, according to the news release. An arrhythmia is a change in the electrical impulses in the heart, leading it to beat inconsis- tently, according to the release. This can aect the body’s blood ow and can be life threatening if left untreated. Dr. Osama T. Niazi, an electrophysiologist at Chandler Regional’s arrhythmia center, said in the months since the center has opened, sta have seen an increase in the number of patients

they have been able to help get to better health outcomes. “Abnormal heart rhythms are either too slow or too fast, and treatment can vary person to person,” Niazi said. “It can make people feel tired or short of breath and lose consciousness. In some, it can cause the heart to become weak over time and can cause them to feel a shortness of breath. Symptoms are usually very subtle, but the key is to tease that out and see if we can oer something to help x it.” Niazi said prior to the center, the model had a patient going to a primary care physician or the emergency room and then to a cardiologist and nally to a clinic specializing in arrhythmia. “This cuts out that middle step and allows people to get to us faster,” Niazi said. “Having a dedicated clinic available to refer patients to gives them faster access to treatment. We are now kind of directly connected with cardiologists in the East Valley alongside emergency departments and primary care doctors and can get involved much sooner. We know that the earlier you treat them, the better patients do.”

SYMPTOMS

WHEN TO SEEKHELP A uttering in the chest A racing heartbeat (tachycardia) A slow heartbeat (bradycardia) Chest pain Shortness of breath

People should seek urgent medical care if they suddenly or frequently experience any of these signs and symptoms at a time when they would not expect to feel them.

Chandler Regional Medical Center 1955 W. Frye Road, Chandler 480-728-3000 www.dignityhealth.org

W. FRYE RD.

W. PECOS RD.

SOURCE: MAYO CLINICCOMMUNITY IMPACT NEWSPAPER

15

CHANDLER EDITION • JUNE 2021

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